thirty is an online exhibition programme ran in collaboration between Set The Controls and 12ø collective, Leeds and London. Both galleries will be undertaking the task of presenting a new exhibition daily on a shared platform.

Throughout the thirty days 12ø collective will be pulling work directly from the project 3OWORKS3ODAYS, in which participating artists are required to submit a work a day. Turning thirty into an almost instantaneous loop from artist production to display. These works will be curated and presented alongside other work selected by 12ø.

12ø is an artist run space and collective based in Stoke Newington, London, aiming to experiment with the premises of an artists practice. Founded in response to a lack of alternative and inclusive opportunities outside of institutions for emerging artists, by hosting and creating projects concerned with engagement, experimentation and exploiting both what we do and don’t know. www.12ocollective.com

Set The Controls For The Heart Of The Sun is a not-for-profit arts organisation in Leeds city centre, providing studios for artists and a public gallery with an annual programme of contemporary art exhibitions, commissions, residencies and events. www.stcfthots.co.uk
TateShots New York City 2016
Sid and Jim
BACKGROUND:Untitled
Abbie Stokes
BACKGROUND:Drops
Hamish Chapman
BACKGROUND:Play is the highest form of research
Kerri Jefferis
/////this needs changing.
Day 1
How do you make work at work?

I'm going to answer this question with a personal response. I work in an art gallery which is - at all times - full of work by other artists. Maybe I could have played with this by installing my own work in the space or responding to getting to know a work in so much detail that I lose my own opinion. But that's not me; that's not my work. Instead, I decided to utilise the time period which underpins my current thinking and that I most look forward to which is lunchtime.

I've been making some very raw performances to camera lately about consuming and a lack of willingness to consume always involving food. They run parallel to my sculptures but I've never quite unpacked them before. I used my lunch break today to film some footage of me eating my lunch - part of the normal working day, and the only point I get a little bit of privacy - which I've now taken to pieces and made a new video work with.

Ellie Barrett

Day 2
Is your work descriptive or performative?

In my work I want to appear as this kind of court-jester, doing things badly and repeating tired clichés to aim at humour. I am trying to clumsily wedge myself into the tradition of painting by repeating and bastardising paintings as covetous objects or religious icons.

I would perhaps describe it, if it were to be performative, to be alluding to that thing from Extras ‘When the laughter stops, when the audience departs, When the make-up has been removed, what is left of the clown? Nothing but an empty costume… I should have listened to that. Do you know who said that? Jean Paul Sartre? Bobby Davro.” But yeah I’d be that crying alcoholic clown trying to struggle at being an artist living in his mum’s house in Kent. That’s the performance side, or rather the allusion I’m making to trying to juggle.

I mean descriptive is too grandiose a term for what I make anyway, I just think of something or someone that people respect and then project it on to a canvas as see if I can paint it in under 5 minutes with cheap paint. It’s purposefully lazy satire. So I suppose it’s more reflective than descriptive.

Harry Hurlock

Day 3
What is your works function and how do you think that function is represented and perceived?

My work is a commentary on art, fuelled by my own cynicism of the art world which I am seemingly trying to reject, yet at the same time I am aware that I am entirely apart of it.

Through a range of text, performances and drawings the work draws upon the everyday banal reality which is my life. Something everyone can relate to, the existentialism that they are not unique yet at the same time think they are a special snowflake.

The words are shared, so they are no longer mine. The work holds itself in a low brow manner such as using cheap paint or cardboard as a canvas. The work even destroys itself in the process of becoming finished. It knocks itself off the pedestal and comments on a lot of young artists being disenfranchised with their practices and constantly trying to play a game where they no longer know the rules. Art can't be radical anymore, as art is just another commodity to be sold; if you're lucky. It's not that this is wrong but it just seems to be a big motivation. Perhaps I'm wrong, it wouldn't be the first time.

Knock the art down. Spit on the art. Set it on fire and piss on it to put it out.

Hopefully anyone can see that it's for them, if they want it to be.

Robert Thomas James Mills

Day 4
How do you think your work operates both in person and in documentation – do you think it changes the reading?

It is evident, that the reading of my work changes a lot from real presence to frozen glances of what once lived. From the very first moment, it is underlined that most of my works are meant to be destroyed, their living period, it is, in that sense ephemeral. For those reasons, the documentation is extremely important allowing me transportation without loss. Still it is never considered the work. The work, it is what had vanished by the time you look to that documentation. It is its absence that counts so to speak.

Henrique Pavão

Day 5
How do you translate an idea or set of ideas into more “finished” works?

For me the process of creating a work starts with a set of seeds, these seeds may take the form of a clip from the internet or a passage in a book. The seeds lay in my head waiting to germinate and, when they do, the real work begins. Nurturing the ideas with time and care – not rushing them to an end result – and allowing the offshoots to run their course leads to a stable and healthy plant; maybe I have stretched the metaphor too far.

Translating the idea I think works much in the same way as Google Translate; the idea in your head is the perfect form, the native speaker, the idea that you run through the translation system and come out with is often close to this but not identical. This however is often good, as the slight faults – as with slight faults in language can often be the most interesting part. As for the idea of “finished”, I’m not sure that anything can be finished – even a concrete block has a life cycle.

Bjarni Ellingboe

Day 6
How does text play a part in your practice?

To answer your question, I'm not sure if text does play a part in my practice beyond communicating, inviting, sharing, promoting. I suppose in that way, it's more of a tool in the process of production. Though perhaps I've just explained how it is a part, rather than how it's not.

Louise Hobson

Day 7
How does falsehood or the replica feature in your practice?

Why would I replicate the new? Do I try to replicate the new? When is something new, does it only exist for a second? I’m not sure how I deal with falsehood or falsification. I guess I deal with it by ignoring it in many ways, my own falsehood, trying to ‘investigate’ or starting to investigate a topic and only fluttering the edges. Surly this is the sense of falsehood I should try to replicate again. False for trying to replicate others work, replicating ideas. I don’t know so here’s a replica I made whilst sat here.

Sam Hewland

Day 8
How do time and duration feature in your practice?

I guess I’m a faux-truth, using multiple belief systems, cobbled together and abandoned when they are no longer in service. Participation is vital in providing perpetual depth to the viewer. Buffer time is offered in the form of a package deal of meaning in a rehearsed production.

Aimee Walker

Day 9
What makes an object visually interesting for you?

The object is not interesting in itself - it is the viewer who finds the interest. Usually I don't find the visual qualities of things that interesting as just looking at stuff is sort of boring.

Harry Meadley

Day 10
How do you feel the readymade as a thing or as an idea play a part in your work?

Readymades often act as prompts for visual components, costume, text, routes for meaning. I source and collect manufactured and found objects that I find peculiar in some way, or that I find are unbalanced or intriguing. That could be due to the way they look or what they stand for or how they represent some kind of idea, hope or promise that seems unreasonable or unlikely or confused.

Once I have an idea for a piece of work I'll often collect a series of manufactured and found objects, which then get chosen and tested within the wider work. Some are selected, others sit on something like a subs bench in my studio, where they could stay until a piece of work they are fitter for, or come into the work if they cut that particular flavour of mustard. But it's always negotiating an object's visual presence in the work, what it stands for as an idea, what it's called/referred to, description and it's relationship with the other objects and the other components in work: text, performance, installation, costume, video, which are usually developed simultaneously.

I often use readymade objects because they already exist with a set of meanings, connotations that I can manipulate, accentuate, re-articulate ('ate' 'ate' 'ate' (hate)). And there's some really weird shit around that I'm constantly surprised by, so in a way it helps in always having something to work with or at least to look at to spur ideas even if I end up ignoring them.

Beth Kettel

Day 11
How do you feel previous work influences your current practice?

I imagine when I start making a new piece of a work a dusty unused part of my brain is engaged that begins the process of replaying to itself, every single question or decision I’ve had to take regarding making an artwork. Going right back to the genesis of me as an artist, whenever that was. The answers to these questions are the fundamentals of what I consider to be anyone’s practice. I imagine everyone has extremely different questions and very different answers.

A lot of these questions will be answered so quickly I’m not even aware I’ve had to ask them. Some questions I will have to consciously think about and answer again, which act as a kind affirmation. Then you’ll have a brand new question to answer. This will be the product of whatever it is I’ve been looking at, reading, watching or thinking about in the past few months since the last hurdle.

Eventually this question, which felt like such a make or break decision, such a struggle to answer or deal with, will gradually in time recoil into that dusty corner somewhere inside your brain, and you’ll find yourself not realising you need to answer it ever again. But it’s still there being asked subconsciously. This trail of questions and its answers are the result of my engagement with the culture and reality, and are the definers of my practice. As time passes more questions will be asked and answered which allows for your work to get more complex and interesting, you understand its nuisances better and it has way more to draw from. I see it as a kind of muscle memory that you can re-employ, but that’s also betting more and more advanced.

Dominic Watson

Day 12
Do you think you make the work you think you should make?

This is a great question I have been grappling with recently myself. My recent works now seem like distant relatives to my older works, now involving much more obvious narratives and stories within them. Starting to comment on the world around me and the structures of the urban environment in more direct way, through the visuals and spoken word.

Though perhaps not extreme enough or there is another part of me that really wants to connect with people physically through activities and conversations. Which lead me to partner with Nikki Kane in founding Common Ground. An organisation that creates public events with a longer aim to engage with critical social and political ideas.

So in answer, yes currently but the more I make the more comfortable I feel with what I am doing and perhaps at one point in the future I will truly feel comfortable. I'm thinking more looseness and performance is needed in my work so perhaps that is the way?

Bobby Sayers

Day 13
Tell me about an unrealised project and what caused it to be unrealised.

Day 14
For you, when is a work “finished”?

… - 5PM
  • work prilarmy in text


  • YOU BECOME FED UP
  • WHEN YOU WAKE UP!!!

  • YOU REACH A LEVEL OF SATISFACTION

  • WHAT DO YOU MEAN BY A WORK?

  • YOU REALISE IT IS THE ONLY WAY THAT THE "WORK"; COULD AND SHOULD EVER EXIST

  • YOU ACCIDENTALLY BECOME AWARE THAT THE WORK IS ALREADY AS COMPLETE AS IT EVER NEEDS TO BE

  • SOMEONE INFORMS YOU OF THEIR EMOTIONS REGARDING AN OBJECT YOU SHOWED THEM

  • WHEN YOU DIE

  • (NEW DAY = NEW WORK)

  • WHEN THERES NO PAINT LEFT IN THE TUBE AND YOU JUST DONT KNOW WHAT ELSE TO DO
  • WHEN YOU START A NEW WORK /
    *GET OVER YOUR SELF*
  • WHAT DO YOU MEAN BY FINISHED?
  • WHEN YOU REALISE IT WAS NEVER ABOUT MAKING WORKS BUT THE WHOLE BODY OF WORK

  • YOU RUN OUR OF MONEY TO DO ANYTHING
  • YOU RUN OUT OF OPTIONS OF THINGS TO DO
  • YOU GET PUT IN PRISON

  • THE INTERNET BREAKS.
    (&/OR);
    — {YOU LOOSE WIFI CONNECTION};
  • EVERYONE ELSE ON THE PLANET HAS DIED. .
Jack Fisher

Day 15
How does site specificity play a part in your work?

Hey, generally speaking my work isn't site specific. Although saying that, as you know, I'm currently taking part in Glasgow International in a group exhibition in a library. It naturally became important that the work had a connection and correlation to the library. The space is inherently quiet and commands a contemplative atmosphere and is similar to that of a study space. It’s also a very child friendly library and one of the works I’ve put in is a cuttings book that I made when I was 8- it’s quite nostalgic and also something to read/look through. I’ve also created an archive of laminated drawings which reference the notice boards and library signs. If the space asks for something specific then I will always consider it but I don’t usually make work with a specific place in mind.

Hamish Chapman
Untitled (saunter): sketch of work in progress
Rosa Nussbaum
& Tom Wadley